St Davids Day

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ST DAVIDS FLAGS AND BUNTING

St. David’ Day
Saint David's Day is the feast day of St Davidon March 1st, the date of Saint David's demise in 589 AD. This day has frequently been celebrated since the canonisation of David in the twelfth century (by Pope Callistus II).
There are a lot of stories about Saint David. However, it can be difficult to isolate legend from reality. He built up a strict religious network in what is currently St David's in south-west Pembroke shire and ended up known both for his devout grimness and his capacity to perform marvels. Most broadly, he is said to have made the ground ascend underneath his feet while lecturing at Llandewi Brefi, with the goal that all in the group of onlookers could hear his message.
St. David’s Day Flag
The St. David’s DayWelsh flagis a gold cross on a dark background represents St. David’s Cross, albeit different varieties do exist. These incorporate a dark cross on a gold setting and engrailed edges on the cross.
The Origins of the Welsh flag
The Welsh flag is that as it may, highlights a splendid red mythical dragon with wings, spikes, and a pointed tail, put on a green and white setting. The dragon itself has been related with Wales for a considerable length of time. However, the real starting point of its association with the nation remains unknown.
It appears Roman occupation was what kicked everything off, as the tokens they bore on their armory, called Draco standards, were probably going to have propelled the dragon interface. The foundation is thought to have originated from the Tudors, a Welsh line who governed the English position of royalty from 1485 to 1603, and whose official hues were green and white (however the leek, a Welsh image, is likewise green and white).
Among the legendary associations with the mythical dragon, are a prophecy made by the wizard Merlin about a fight between a white and red monster – the white speaking to the Saxons and the red the successful Britons.